next… join me!

next… join me!

Arritey. So my last post, right before the election, said that this election was a referendum on the question, “ARE WOMEN PEOPLE?” And the answer was, No. Women: Not quite people. Maybe almost people. But not quite. Not enough. Also brown and black people. Almost people, maybe, but not quite. And that has made the last few months pretty rough, because a lot of people I know are women, or not white, and some of them are even women who are not white. Some of them are Jews or Muslims.  Some of them are poor, or have been poor, or love

BMI, mortality, weight stigma, science… *sigh*

BMI, mortality, weight stigma, science… *sigh*

You guys, I really enjoy Health Care Triage, a video series on health-relalted issues that often includes the phrase “To the research!” – which is basically my life motto – so of course it’s, like, my fave. You should totally watch these takedowns about milk and vaccines not causing autism. So I cringed a LOT when I realized I was going to write a blog post being critical about the newest video, on the relationship between BMI and health. It’s based on a giant new meta-analysis. Here is the research paper itself and here is the video:   So. Look

Kinsey’s “new priorities”: a threat to humanity? (Answer: No.) (Sorry.)

Kinsey’s “new priorities”: a threat to humanity? (Answer: No.) (Sorry.)

Dan Savage is FREAKING OUT, you guys, because Sue Carter, the new head of the Kinsey Institute (where I was trained) told a USA Today reporter that she was going to be studying sex in the context of relationships. Let me say first that I think I GET why this triggers so much fear in Dan Savage – indeed, why it prompts him to tell his massive readership that they, too, should “be very, very afraid.” He has been part of a culturally CRUCIAL push to de-“should”-ize sex, to let sex be in a person’s life whatever it wants to

my TEDx talk! “Unlocking the Door to Your Authentic Sexual Wellbeing”

In January I went to Reno and spent about fifteen minutes explaining the two keys to unlock the door to your own authentic sexual wellbeing. [SPOILER: the keys are CONFIDENCE and JOY] And for those who hate videos, here’s a transcript of the talk as it was written (which is not 100% as it was spoken… but almost.) I am a sex educator. It’s the best job in the world. In the fall of 2010 I taught a class called Women’s Sexuality at Smith College. It was a 100-level introductory class, but I shoe-horned in all the science I could

Chicago Ideas Week video [THRILLING UPDATE] #pleasureisthemeasure

Chicago Ideas Week video [THRILLING UPDATE] #pleasureisthemeasure

Hey everybody! The video of my talk from Chicago Ideas week talk is up! It’s 12 minutes of me Bringing the Science. I had a great time in Chicago and the Ideas Week people treated us speakers like we hung the moon. If you ever get a chance go to, GO. UPDATE: They also posted the short Q&A with all of the sexuality speakers, including me, Chris Donaghue, Abiola Abrams, and Ducky DooLittle. THEY WERE ALL SO FABULOUS.

in which emily brings the science

in which emily brings the science

Hey everybody, in about two hours, I’ll spend 12 minutes at Chicago Ideas Week explaining responsive desire and why Flibanserin is bogus. Hilariously, I go on about two hours after Cindy Whitehead, (BRILLIANT) CEO of the company that shepherded the drug through FDA approal, who spoke in a “Medical Breakthroughs” session. Chicago Ideas Week tweeted her talk this way: Science won…and so did women. @SproutPharma #CIWMedical #CIW — Chicago Ideas (@chicagoideas) October 17, 2015   Well. My job is to bring the science, free of any profit motive.   I’ll be mentioning some Sciencey Facty-Facts, so I’m taking this opportunity

Flibanserin, the FDA, and the longing for spontaneous sexual desire

Flibanserin, the FDA, and the longing for spontaneous sexual desire

The FDA Advisory Committee voted 18-6 to recommend approval of Flibanserin, the twice-failed antidepressant being marketed as “pink Viagra.” Quick summary: the drug increases “sexually satisfying events” by one per month over placebo, and roughly 13% of women who take it experience side effects like somnolence, dizziness, and nausea.   I watched as much as I could of the live webcast, particularly during the open comment section, when women who’ve struggled with low desire described their longing for something, anything to help them. It was very moving, and I believe that it was for those women that the committee members voted

audiobook of Come as You Are!

One of the things I’ve been busy doing instead of writing blog posts is reading the entirety of my book out loud, while sitting in a tiny sound-proof room. The result is now available for pre-order here. (iTunes coming soon!) And here’s a sample! The audiobook matters a lot to me because it makes the book accessible to people with learning differences and visual impairments. I’m really, really, really excited about it.